The article “Cure Yourself of Tree Blindness” by Gabriel Popkin discusses how humans have forgotten the importance of knowing the identity of the trees that surround them. Back in the day, humans relied on trees for survival by knowing which ones were strong enough to build a shelter or which were reliable enough to use as a food source. Nowadays, most humans cannot differentiate most trees and often categorize them based on their color. The importance of being able to identify and differentiate trees is crucial for uncovering forgotten history, understanding the climate of our environment, and utilizing the natural resources trees have to offer us.

The trees surrounding my friend’s apartment are so beautiful! I had never gone up close to observe the differences between these trees, but once I truly observed the components of each tree, I was amazed!

Liriodendron tulipifera– aka “Tulip Tree:

This Tulip tree has an alternate leaf arrangement, a palmately compound leaf complexity, and a lobed leaf margin. This tree was found on my walk through grandview! The tulip tree grows in  The tulip tree is native to eastern North America and flourishes in normal moisture. An interesting fact about Tulip trees is that they don’t bloom for their first 15 years. Although once they start to bloom, they can continue blooming until the end of their life span which is approximately 200-250 years. https://www.gardenguides.com/12212749-tulip-tree-facts.html

Aesculus glabra– aka “Ohio Buckeye”:

This Ohio buckeye has an opposite leaf arrangement, palmately compound leaf complexity, and has a toothed leaf margin. I found this Buckeye at Battelle Darby Creek park. The Ohio Buckeye’s habitat is a moist woodland and sheltered areas. An interesting fact about the buckeye tree is that its nuts resemble the shape and color of a deer’s eye.https://ohiohistorycentral.org/w/Ohio%27s_State_Tree_-_Buckeye

Pinus strobus– aka “Eastern White Pine”

The Eastern White pine is a 3 whorled leaf arrangement, has a simple leaf complexity and the leaf margin is smooth. This eastern White pine was found on my walk through Grandview! The Eastern white pine is found in cool humid areas with soil that is well drained. A fun fact about the Eastern White pine is that Eastern white pine needles contain five times the amount of Vitamin C of a lemon. https://kids.kiddle.co/Eastern_White_Pine#:~:text=Eastern%20white%20pine%20needles%20contain,also%20a%20source%20of%20resveratrol.

Acer platanoides– aka “Norway Maple”

The Norway Maple has an opposite leaf arrangement, has a simple leaf complexity, and it has a lobed leaf margin. This Norway maple was found in a Grandview complex. Norway maples flourish in a variety of environments including forests, wetlands, yards, and gardens! A fun fact about the Norway maple is that it is a good tree to be in a city because it can highly tolerate smoke and dust. http://www.bio.brandeis.edu/fieldbio/Verrill_Wolf/pages/norway_maple.html

Malus– aka “Apple Tree”:

This apple tree has an alternate leaf arrangement, the leaf complexity is simple, and the leaf margin is serrate. I found this apple tree near a community pool on my walk through Marble Cliff!  Apple trees are able to grow best in climates where the summer has moderate temperatures with medium to high humidity and the winters are cold. A fun fact about the apple tree is that this tree originated in central Asia. https://www.adama.com/en/our-commitment/global-farming/farming-crops/apple-facts#:~:text=The%20name%20Malus%20domestica%20is,stands%20up%20to%2012m%20tall.

Magnolia– aka “Sweetbay Magnolia”:

The Sweetbay Magnolia has an alternate leaf arrangement, it has a simple leaf complexity, and it has an entire leaf margin. This sweetbay magnolia was found at  an apartment complex in Grandview! Sweetbay magnolias grow in moist woodlands, around streams, and swamps and areas with generally wet soil.  A fun fact about the sweetbay magnolia is Magnolia Trees have actually been around for quite a long time, with fossils dating back 36 million to 58 million years ago. https://www.lovingly.com/featured-content/unwrapped-blog/lifestyle/top-5-magnolia-tree-facts/

 

Now onto… ASHES!

Fraxinus pennsylvanica- aka “Green Ash”:

This Green ash is opposite in leaf arrangement, it is pinnately compound in leaf complexity, and its leaf margins are serrate. This green ash was also found on my walk around a Grandview apartment complex. Green ashes grow well in a variety of conditions but it prefers areas with wet soil conditions. An interesting fact about the Green ash is that the leaflets of this tree are green on both surfaces. http://www.museum.state.il.us/muslink/forest/htmls/trees/F-pennsylvanica.html#:~:text=Interesting%20Facts&text=Green%20ash%20has%20leaflets%20that,along%20the%20stalks%20between%20leaflets.

Fraxinus americana- aka “White Ash:

This white ash is opposite in leaf arrangement, its leaf complexity is pinnately compound, and its leaf margin is entire. This white ash was found in Grandview! White ashes are native to North America are found in many parks, large yards, and other common environments. The wood of the white ash is interestingly used by the Louisville Slugger for their baseball bats.  https://www.lakeforest.edu/academics/majors-and-minors/environmental-studies/fraxinusand160americana-and160(white-ash)-family-name-oleaceae#:~:text=Fun%20Facts%3A,%2C%20and%20fairly%20light%2Dweight.

Popkin, Gabriel. “Cure Yourself of Tree Blindness.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 26 Aug. 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/26/opinion/sunday/cure-yourself-of-tree-blindness.html.